Dorchester Illustration 2322 Henry J. Barry

2322 Henry Barry

Dorchester Illustration no. 2322        Henry J. Barry

At the Dorchester Historical Society, we are in the process of a year-long project to commemorate the 100-year anniversary of World War 1. Using a collection of photographs we have of World War 1 Dorchester residents, we will be featuring servicemen and women in a number of short biographies throughout the year. At the culmination of the project, we hope to produce an online exhibit which highlights these men and women and their service to our country.

We are so excited to be sharing our next biography for Henry J. Barry. After seeing our posts about World War I Dorchester veterans, Henry’s daughter Marion Barry Callinan provided scans of photographs of her father.  We are happy to feature him and honor this World War I veteran!

HENRY J. BARRY

Mrs. Marion (Barry) Callinan found out about our World War I Dorchester servicemen project and asked if we would honor her father by featuring him in a short biography. She even came to meet us and brought some of her father’s medals for us to look at. We were happy to oblige and add Henry to our collective memory of Dorchester’s World War I veterans!

John Henry Barry was born on March 3, 1898 to parents Henry and Maria (Davis) Barry who were living at 3 Savin Hill Avenue in Dorchester. To his family, he was always known as Henry.

Henry enlisted in the National Guard in June of 1916 when he was 18 years old. This was shortly after Mexico’s attack on the United States by the famed general, Pancho Villa. Henry served with the Mexican Border Service as a part of Company “C” in the 9th Massachusetts Infantry of the National Guard. However, war with Mexico never came and Henry returned to Massachusetts only to get ready for an imminent war with Germany.

Henry mustered out on April 4, 1917 as a private, just two days before President Wilson and the United States officially declared war on Germany. He served in the 101st Infantry Division until he was discharged in April of 1919. While he was in the Army, he was involved in a number of engagements, all in France, including: Champagne-Marne, Aisne-Marne, Meuse-Argonne, and St. Mihiel. When he was honorably discharged in 1919, Henry moved back home with his parents in Dorchester. He received commendations for his service from both Mayor of Boston, James Michael Curley, and Massachusetts Governor Samuel McCall.

Sometime in the early 1920s, Henry married Florence Raithel. In 1930, they were living at 192 Savin Hill Avenue in the Savin Hill neighborhood of Dorchester with their four children: John (6), Paul (5), Harold (3) “aka” Hap, and Arthur (0). Henry is listed on the United States Census as a “line-o-typer” in the newspaper industry and listed as a World War I veteran. In 1940, not much has changed; the family is still living on Savin Hill Avenue with Henry working in the newspaper industry. But now, the Barry’s are a family of seven, having had a daughter, Marion, who is now 6.

Henry stayed in Dorchester for the rest of his life, until he died suddenly on June 20, 1980 at the age of 82. His obituary indicates that he was a printer for the Boston Post and the Herald Traveler. He was a member of the Boston Typographical Union No. 13 and retired in 1965 from the Herald Traveler. He was a grandfather of 10 when he died and is buried in Mt. Hope Cemetery in Mattapan. As of 2017, the Barry family house on Savin Hill Avenue had been sold and Henry’s children, Marion (83) and John (93) are still living in Massachusetts.

Sources:

Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.

Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.

Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010.

Ancestry.com. 1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002.

Ancestry.com. 1940 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2012.

Ancestry.com. Massachusetts Birth Records, 1840-1915 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA:

Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2013.

Ancestry.com. Massachusetts, Death Index, 1901-1980 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA:

Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2013.

Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2011.

Military, Compiled Service Records. World War I. Carded Records. Records of the Military Division of the Adjutant General’s Office, Massachusetts National Guard.

“Henry J. Barry” obituary, Boston Globe, June 21, 1980.

 

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Dorchester Illustration 2321 Baker Chocolate Silos

2321 Baker Chocolate silos

Dorchester Illustration no. 2321        Baker Chocolate Silos

Eighteen large silos and a grain elevator were built in 1941 as storage, in anticipation of World War II and expected difficulties in securing cacao beans. The “Baker Chocolate” painted silos remained a landmark in the Lower Mills for four decades. The silos were never filled to capacity, and in 1987 they were demolished.

The following is from:

Sweet History: Dorchester and the Chocolate Factory. Copyright The Bostonian Society, 2005.

A large grain elevator and nine pairs of concrete silos, originally located behind the Forbes Mill, stored cocoa beans for many years. The silos were built in response to the outbreak of World War II, when there was a high demand to supply chocolate rations for soldiers. Baker’s stepped up its production because “there must be no shortage of chocolate, which is a chief essential of emergency rations for an army in the field.”  The location of the silos near the Forbes Mill centralized roasting operations, simplified the manufacturing process, and saved on space and man power. The “Baker Chocolate” painted silos remained a landmark in the Lower Mills for decades. They were torn down in 1987.

Check out the Dorchester Historical Society’s online catalog at

http://dorchester.pastperfectonline.com/

The archive of these historical posts can be viewed on the blog at www.dorchesterhistoricalsociety.org

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Dorchester Illustration 2320 Tristram Campbell

2320 Tristram Campbell

Dorchester Illustration no. 2320        Tristram Campbell

At the Dorchester Historical Society, we are in the process of a year-long project to commemorate the 100th anniversary of World War I. Using a collection of photographs we have of WWI Dorchester residents, we will be featuring service men and women in a number of short biographies throughout the year. At the culmination of the project, we hope to produce an online exhibit which highlights these men and women and their service to our country.

Tristram Campbell

The card in the collection gives us these details: Lt. Tristram Joseph Campbell. 123 Ashmont Street. 3rd Aviation Instruction Centre, American E. F. France. Picture taken n France.

Tristram Joseph Campbell was born in Charlestown, February 4, 1895, to parents Tristram and Anna.  His mother died in 1901, and by 1910 Tristram was living in the house owned by his grandmother, Catherine Doherty, at 123 Ashmont Street, Dorchester.  The other people living in the house were his uncle James Doherty, a clerk; Tristram’s brother Robert who was two years younger; and Annie Flaherty, a servant.

Tristram registered for the draft at age 22, when he was a student at MIT.  He was single, slender, of medium height, with black hair and brown eyes.  The 1920 Boston Directory lists him as a student, so it is probable that returned to MIT after the War.  He married Dorothy Barnes Smith in Old Orchard, York, Maine, on August 8, 1922.  They had a daughter Dorothy and a son Tristram, and by 1930 they were living in Camden, New Jersey.  His World War II Draft Registration shows that he was working as an engineer at the Bendix Corporation.

Tristram died December 7, 1961, and is buried in the Hartford Cemetery, White River Junction, VT.

Sources:

All from Ancestry.com

Birth Record

Mother’s Death Record

1910 US Census (uncle James’ occupation undreadable)

World War I Draft Registration

1920 US Census

1920 Boston City Directory

Marriage Record

1930 US Census

1940 US Census

World War II Draft Registration

Headstone Application for Veterans

plus

List of the Residents of Boston, 1909 (shows uncle James as a clerk)

 

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September 22, 2017 2 pm at All Saints Church – Dorchester Architecture

SaintPeters__Trefoil_101815

Sunday, October 22nd, 2 pm., The Dorchester Historical Society will present a program at All Saints Church.

Hidden Treasures of Dorchester

A rich trove of architectural and artistic work has survived Dorchester’s nearly four hundred years.  From Puritan homesteads, like the Blake and Pierce House, to museums like the John F. Kennedy Library and Edward Kennedy Institute, Dorchester is filled with the  hallmarks of American history.

Mr. Saxe has expanded on his popular lectures on Dorchester houses to include other significant structures in town, includes its historically and architecturally significant churches and what they say about changing religions and society in the United States.  Mr. Saxe  explores inside the churches to view some of the amazing art crafted by some of America’s best artisans.  All Saints Church in Ashmont is significant not only for the history of Dorchester but also for the development of Gothic Revival style in the United States and the Arts & Crafts movement. St. Peter’s on Meeting House Hill is one of the finest examples of the work of the prolific Irish Catholic architect, Patrick Keely. On Jones Hill, St. Mary’s Episcopal contains one of the most intricate ceilings of famed English architect, Henry Vaughan, while Edward Clark Cabot produced his homage to the traditional New England meeting house in the rebuilt First Parish from 1896.

Architecturally significant houses, including selected interior photos, will also be featured as milestones in Dorchester’s development. Mr. Saxe will also discuss the Baker Chocolate Factory as a superb example of the re-purposing of historic structures for modern needs.

Those who have already attended Mr. Saxe’s very popular lectures on Dorchester’s historic houses will see the results of expanded and deepened research and view the best samples of his growing archive of now 15,000 photographs.

This is not a lecture on “lost Dorchester” but an exuberant display of the houses and buildings in Dorchester which still exist and can be visited today, having survived the town’s colorful and often turbulent 400 years.

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September 15, 2017 2 pm Poetry Reading at Dorchester Historical Society

Sunday, October 15th, 2 pm, The Dorchester Historical Society will present a program at the William Clapp House, 195 Boston Street.

Sandra Kohler and U Meleni Adebo, Dorchester residents who have worked with Aaron Devine at the Write on the DOT program at UMass Boston, will present readings of their poetry inspired at least in part by the place in which we live.  Aaron will introduce the program with more information about Write on the DOT, a literary reading series that features Dorchester writers alongside UMass Boston MFA students in creative writing.

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Dorchester Illustration 2319 Dome of Savin Hill and Aviation Field

2319 Postcard Dome of Savin Hill with aviation field

Dorchester Illustration no. 2319        Dome of Savin Hill

Postcard. Caption on front: Dome of Savin Hill.

Practically any scene was fair game for the creation of a post card in the early years of the 20th century, when post cards were very popular.  This post card shows the rocky crest of Savin Hill with a bit of the view toward Squantum.  This is the second example of a postcard that we have seen where the airfield at Squantum has been indicated by the later addition of an illustration of a dirigible and typed caption “Aviation Field” to indicate Squantum in the background.  This card also has a typed date Sept. 3-15, 1910.

The Harvard Boston Aero Meet was held at the Harvard Aero Field in Atlantic, MA (now Squantum) September 3 to 13, 1910. This was the first aero meet in the Eastern United States and second in the country.  Originally planned for Soldiers Field in the Allston section of Boston in August, the meet was moved to the more open area by Dorchester Bay in anticipation of large attendance.  The international contestants raced for money prizes, attracting thousands of spectators, including President Taft.

The aero meet, which drew both professional and amateur aviators from England and from the Wright Company and Curtiss Company, was a popular success with approximately 60,000 spectators attending.  The meet officially closed on September 13, but on September 14th, the Keith Theater Company of Boston engaged the meet’s star performer from England, Claude Grahame White, who made demonstration flights and also made flights with passengers who paid $500 for the privilege.

For more photos of the Harvard Boston Aero Meet of 1910 see https://airandspace.si.edu/collection-objects/harvard-boston-aero-meet-photographs-1910

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Dorchester Illustration 2318 Axel W. Lagerquist

2318 Axel Lagerquist

Dorchester Illustration no. 2318        Axel  W. Lagerquist

 

At the Dorchester Historical Society, we are in the process of a year-long project to commemorate the 100th anniversary of World War I. Using a collection of photographs we have of WWI Dorchester residents, we will be featuring servicemen and women in a number of short biographies throughout the year. At the culmination of the project, we hope to produce an online exhibit which highlights these men and women and their service to our country.

Our next biography features:Axel W. Lagerquist

Axel Wilhelm Lagerquist was born 23 March 1890 in Hjalmseryd, in the Jonkoping region of Sweden which is in the Province of Smaland. Parent’s names are unknown. Axel immigrated to the United States in 1908. He was 18 years old when he left his father, G. Lagerquist, whom he listed as his nearest relative.  He traveled by train to Gottenburg, Sweden. He left Sweden on 28 September 1908 by boat to Hull, England where he would take a train to Liverpool.  He sailed on 8 October 1908 from Liverpool & Queenstown on the Lusitania (about 1 year after her maiden voyage) and arrived in New York on 10 October 1908 destined for Newton, Mass. Several years later on 23 February 1911, he filed his Declaration of Intention to become a U.S. citizen.

By June 5, 1917, when Axel registered for the Draft, he was 27 years old, married and living on Norfolk St., Dorchester.  He was a manager of a grocery store, J. T. Connor Co., 2249 Dorchester Ave., Milton and the sole support of his wife. He was tall and slender with blue eyes and blonde hair. His place of birth was listed as Jonkoping, Sweden.

He enlisted in R.A.N.G.E.R.C. and was inducted at Division #21, Boston, Mass. on March29, 1918 at age 28 at Camp Devens. He served in Company C, 303 MG Battalion, until November 7, 1918 and Company C, 148 MG Battalion until discharge. He became Private First Class on July 1, 1918 and Corporal on August 23, 1918. He filed his Petition for Naturalization on 5 June 1918 and then served overseas from July 10, 1918 until June 29, 1919. He was honorably discharged at Camp Mills, Long Island, New York, on July 7, 1919.

On his Petition for Naturalization signed at Camp Devens, he listed his spouse as Esther J. Lagerquist, born in Lamhult (Lammhult), Sweden, on 1 November 1889. He is listed as being born in Lamhult also which is in the same area as listed above, so perhaps they knew each other in the old country. They were listed living on Norfolk St., Mattapan and had a daughter born 1 June 1918. His occupation was listed as “soldier-merchant”.

In the 1920 census, the family consisted of Axel, Esther and daughter Ruth on Dorchester Ave., Boston. He was again listed as a manager of grocery store. In 1923, Axel became a member of the Macedonian Lodge of the Masons.

In 1930 and 1940 census, the family of 3 was living on Wendell Pak East, Milton, Mass. and Axel owned his business.

In 1942, Axel registered for the Draft at age 52. He lived on Dyer Ave, Milton and was his own employer at 1168 Washington St., Dorchester. His wife, Esther, was listed as his next of kin.

On 1 June 1949, Axel remarried to Janet Frances Bates and on 13 March 1956, he changed his Masonic affiliation to Wellesley, Mass.

On 6 November 1969, Axel died at age 79. He was living on Prospect St., Wellesley Hills, Mass. He was survived by his daughter Mrs. Joseph (Ruth) McCann of Norwood and 2 grandchildren. A Masonic service was held at the Waterman Chapel, 592 Washington St., Wellesley.

Do you know more about Axel Lagerquist? We would love to hear from you! All material has been researched by volunteers  at the Dorchester Historical Society, so please let us know if we got something wrong or you think a piece of the story is missing! You can reach us through the contact box at the bottom of the Dorchester Historical Society’s home page on its website www.dorchesterhistoricalsociety.org.

References:

Passenger List, 1908, Ancestry.com

Draft Registration, WW1 & WW11, FamilySearch.com

Naturalization Record, Ancestry.com

U.S. Census Records, 1920, 1930, 1940, FamilySearch.com

Mason Member Card, Ancestry.com

Death Record, 1969, FamilySearch.com

Obituary, Boston Globe, 7 Nov 1969

Service Record, Military Museum, Concord, MA

Dr. Perkins’ notes

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Dorchester Illustration 2317 Ralph Stevens Bissett

2317 Randolph S Bissett

Dorchester Illustration no. 2317       Ralph Stevens Bissett

At the Dorchester Historical Society, we are in the process of a year-long project to commemorate the 100th anniversary of World War I. Using a collection of photographs we have of WWI Dorchester residents, we will be featuring servicemen and women in a number of short biographies throughout the year. At the culmination of the project, we hope to produce an online exhibit which highlights these men and women and their service to our country.

Our next biography features: Ralph Stevens Bissett

Ralph was born on October 19, 1899 to Albert Bissett and Georgie Ellen (Stevens) of Falcon Street in East Boston. His father was born in St. John, New Brunswick and was a painter (listed as house decorator). His mother was born in Portland, Maine. In 1900, there were three Bissett families living at the same address or next door which included Albert’s brothers, sister and mother.

By 1910, the Bissett families had moved. Ralph was an only child at age 10 living with his parents on Temple Street in West Roxbury.  His uncles, aunt, and grandmother had moved to Stoughton and Malden.

According to Dr. Perkins in 1917, Ralph was living on Branch Street in Dorchester. He enlisted May 10, 1917, in the Harvard University Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) and then re-enlisted at Camp Devens on September 17, 1917 (Camp Devens was established in 1917 and didn’t become Fort Devens until 1931). He served in the 302nd Field Artillery of the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) as a musician, first class, Headquarters Company; his photograph from Dr. Perkins shows him holding a clarinet.

In 1920, Ralph was again living with his parents on Branch Street and was listed as an electrical inspector. In 1925, he became a member of the Macedonian Lodge of the Massachusetts Masons. His occupation was listed as musician and Northeast District Manager of the White Rock Corporation, one of the largest producers of mineral water in the U.S. at the time. He married about 1928 to Charlotte Josephine Anderson and they were living with Ralph’s parents in 1930. Ralph was listed in the census as a “WW veteran” and a beverage salesman. The census indicates the house was owned and the family owned a radio set. By 1932, Ralph and Charlotte moved to Roosevelt Road in Weymouth. They had one child, Joan, around 1936.

By 1961, the family was living again in Dorchester on Branchfield Street. Ralph’s occupation was listed as “president,” but we are unsure of what this refers to. He retired by 1965 and was living in Clearwater, Florida when he died on May 8, 1969. Services were held Monday, May 12, 1969 from the Deware Brothers Memorial Chapel on Hancock Street in Quincy.

Do you know more about Ralph Stevens Bissett? We would love to hear from you! All material has been researched by volunteers  at the Dorchester Historical Society, so please let us know if we got something wrong or you think a piece of the story is missing! You can reach us through the contact box at the bottom of the Dorchester Historical Society’s home page on its website www.dorchesterhistoricalsociety.org.

 

References:

Birth Record 1899: Familysearch.org

Census Records, 1900, 1910, 1920, 1930, 1940: Familysearch.org

City Directories, Weymouth 1932, 1941; Quincy 1955, 1961; Boston, 1965; Ancestry.com

Death notice: Boston Globe, May 10, 1969

Massachusetts Mason Membership Card: Ancestry.com

 

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Dorchester Illustration 2316 Morgan Brothers Creamery

2316 Morgan Bros. 238 Bowdoin Street

Dorchester Illustration no. 2316    Morgan Brothers Creamery

Some of us are old enough to remember glass milk bottles with cardboard tops.

The Dorchester Historical Society has acquired a quart-sized milk bottle from the Morgan Brothers Creamery.

Their store was located at 238 Bowdoin Street.  The building is gone, and the site  now makes up part of the parking lot of the Bowdoin Street Health Center.

The illustration of the store comes from the Official Program of the Dorchester Day celebration, Saturday, June 5, 1915.

 

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Dorchester Illustration 2315 Harry Erving Morrissey

2315 Harry Erving Morrisey

Dorchester Illustration no. 2315    Harry Erving Morrissey

At the Dorchester Historical Society, we are in the process of a year-long project to commemorate the 100-year anniversary of World War 1. Using a collection of photographs we have of World War 1 Dorchester residents, we will be featuring servicemen and women in a number of short biographies throughout the year. At the culmination of the project, we hope to produce an online exhibit which highlights these men and women and their service to our country.

Our next biography features Harry E. Morrissey:

Harry Morrissey (he also signed his name “Morrisey”) was an immigrant, born  January 31, 1890, in Waterford, New Brunswick. He arrived by train with his mother Mary and three older siblings in Boston on April 15, 1906, a young man of medium height, dark complexion, with black hair and blue eyes. His statement on the border crossing registration was “no relatives in Canada,” so his father may have been deceased.  He gave his full name and his occupation as plumber, a trade he followed throughout his life. Their original address was on Hamilton Street in Dorchester, where his mother is listed as head of household.

Harry registered for the WWI draft on June 5, 1917, having announced his intention to become a US citizen. At that time, he had already married Catherine V. McGuire and had two children, living on Mattapan Street in Mattapan. He served with the American Expeditionary Force, QMC, Chief Purchasing Office.

By 1920, they lived on Cypress Road, Brighton, with three daughters and two sons. By 1930, he had remarried to a woman named Margaret Costello, with whom he had a daughter and son.

At the time of the the WWII draft, Harry was working for J.P. Landers, plumbers, on Bowdoin St., Dorchester, and living on Torrey St., Dorchester. There’s no evidence he was called to serve in that war. He died May 2, 1972, while living in Dorchester. His funeral was at St. Ambrose in Dorchester and he is buried in Braintree.  He was survived by 27 grandchildren and 7 great-grandchildren.

Do you know more about Harry E. Morrissey? We would love to hear from you! All material has been researched by volunteers at the Dorchester Historical Society, so please let us know if we got something wrong or you think a piece of the story is missing! You may contact us through the Dorchester Historical Society website in the box at the bottom of the home screen www.dorchesterhistoricalsociety.org

References:

Ancestry.com:

Massachusetts State and Federal Naturalization record, 15 April 1906.

US Border Crossings from Canada to U.S., 1825-1960

US Draft registration, WWI, WWII

US Census, 1910, 1920, 1930, 1940

 

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