Jan. 29, 2012 The Great Boston Molasses Flood of 1919

Dorchester Historical Society, 195 Boston Street, Dorchester, MA 

 January 29, 2012  at 2 pm.

 Stephen Puleo will talk about The Great Boston Molasses Flood of 1919. 

 On Jan. 15, 1919, a 50-foot-tall steel tank filled with 2.3 million gallons of molasses collapsed on Boston’s waterfront.  The flood demolished wooden homes, even the brick fire station.  The number of dead wasn’t known for days.

 Copies of Mr. Puleo’s book, Dark Tide, may be purchased at the talk ($16.00). Mr. Puleo will be happy to sign your copy.

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5 Responses to Jan. 29, 2012 The Great Boston Molasses Flood of 1919

  1. Del Cain says:

    Earl,I posted a comment elsewhere. about the Society having an annual Molasses Flood of 1919 day…; molasses cakes,cookies, chicken,etc;maybe the Soc. doing a Molasses Cookbook-all to do some good PR PR for your Society. Probably some Dorchester people were involved in some way-firefighters,dock workersetc.,;dress in 1919 costumes…

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    Also left a comment about a house I owned at 15 Mercer St., but while either Polk or Taylor was president(pre-Civil War)…;I traced the pacel of land back to 1848 and an owner waslisted in the Boston City directoy was listed,I believe in 1850. So that brackets that the house was built in 1848 or1849. I sold in 12 years ago and left photocopies of the deeds and Boston City directory listings with the new owners.
    The house had firepalces in every room(except the kitchen),when I owned it and had a smalle behive type oven in the cellar built of brick;(thinkit was an oven). it is a samll house with a granite foundation,painted blue. It got missed when the 1960 survey of old houses was done in Boston. Any other info,get in touch with me.

  2. earltaylor says:

    Please just show up by 2 pm on January 29th at 195 Boston Street, Dorchester, MA, the headquarters of the Dorchester Historial Society. The program is open to the public.

    Earl Taylor
    Dorchester Historical Society

    • Graziane says:

      This is great to see as this old peclas has been in some disrepair for years. The lot this old house sits on being the site of the residence of Thomas Jones which was the original house in the Jones Hill area in 1636.

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