February Program, Feb. 16th 2 pm

 

America’s Kitchens
2 p.m. Sunday, Feburary 16, 2014
Dorchester Historical Society


Nancy Carlisle
Senior Curator of Collections
Historic New England

From the colonial period to the present, the kitchen has been a source of nourishment and comfort. As the place where parents nurture children and families gather at breakfast and dinner, share chores, and discuss the world outside, the kitchen gives meaning to family life. Historic New England curator Nancy Carlisle will discuss how the American kitchen has evolved from the seventeenth-century to the present. Drawing on her book America’s Kitchens, co-authored with Melinda Narardinov, Ms. Carlisle will tell the story of the nation’s kitchens from New England hearths, to Victorian kitchens isolated at the back of the house, to open plan kitchens of 1950s suburbs.

Curator Nancy Carlisle will give an illustrated talk on how the American Kitchen has evolved from the seventeenth-century to the present.  Drawing on her book America’s Kitchens, co-authored with Malinda Narardinov, Ms. Carlisle will tell the story of the nation’s kitchens from New England hearths, to Victorian kitchens isolated at the back of the house, to open plan kitchens of 1950s suburbs, providing new insights into the technological and social changes that have taken place in this room and suggesting how these innovations have transformed kitchen work and changed women’s lives.  There is no Chocolate Cook-off, as at the last few February programs, but here will most definitely be chocolate refreshments. From the colonial period to the present, the kitchen has been a source of nourishment and comfort. As the place where parents nurture children and families gather at breakfast and dinner, share chores, and discuss the world outside, the kitchen gives meaning to family life. Historic New England curator Nancy Carlisle will discuss how the American kitchen has evolved from the seventeenth-century to the present. Drawing on her book America’s Kitchens, co-authored with Melinda Narardinov, Ms. Carlisle will tell the story of the nation’s kitchens from New England hearths, to Victorian kitchens isolated at the back of the house, to open plan kitchens of 1950s suburbs.

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Dorchester Illustration no. 2132 Edward Everett Statue

Dorchester Illustration no. 2131

 

Statue of Edward Everett

Edward Everett’s statue stands in Richardson Park.  First installed in the Boston Public Garden, it was moved to the rotary at Edward Everett Square, and after being toppled by a motorist, it was moved to the nearby park.

Edward Everett, a Representative and a Senator from Massachusetts; born in Dorchester, Mass., April 11, 1794; graduated from Harvard University in 1811; tutor in that university 1812-1814; studied theology and was ordained pastor of the Brattle Street Unitarian Church, Boston, in 1814; professor of Greek literature at Harvard University 1815-1826; overseer of Harvard University 1827-1847, 1849-1854, and 1862-1865; elected to the Nineteenth and to the four succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1825-March 3, 1835); declined to be a candidate for re-nomination in 1834; chairman, Committee on Foreign Affairs (Twentieth Congress); Governor of Massachusetts 1836-1840; appointed United States Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Great Britain 1841-1845; declined a diplomatic commission to China in 1843; president of Harvard University 1846-1849; appointed Secretary of State by President Millard Fillmore to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Daniel Webster and served from November 6, 1852, to March 3, 1853; elected as a Whig to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1853, until his resignation, effective June 1, 1854; unsuccessful candidate for vice president of the United States in 1860 on the Constitutional-Union ticket; died in Boston, Mass., January 15, 1865; interment in Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Mass.

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The Dorchester Illustration is sent occasionally. If you receive this e-mail by mistake, please reply to be taken off the e-mail list. If you know others who would like to receive the daily e-mail, please encourage them to join the group by going to http://groups.google.com/group/dorchester-historical-society. You may contact Earl Taylor at ERMMWWT@aol.com

If you value receiving the illustration, please express your appreciation by making a donation to the Dorchester Historical Society, either by regular mail at 195 Boston Street, Dorchester, MA 02125, or through the website at www.DorchesterHistoricalSociety.org

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Dorchester Illustration no. 2130 Immanuel Church

Dorchester Illustration no. 2130

 

Immanuel Church

Postcard. Caption on front: Immanuel Church, Dorchester, Mass. Postmarked Mar 6, 1908. Dorchester Station, Boston. With one cent stamp. On verso: No. H 12696. The Robbins Bros Co., Boston, Mass. and Germany.

This Baptist church building was located next to the municipal building in Fields Corner.  It suffered a fire in the 1983, and the site is now a parking lot .

The Fire (From the Boston Globe)

Feb. 24, 1983

Fire struck the Immanuel Baptist Church at 191 Adams St. in Dorchester yesterday, destroying the top two floors of the religious home of a small Hispanic congregation, firefighters reported. The blaze began at 5:15 p.m. in the second floor office of the pastor, Rev. Juan Phillips, firefighters at the scene said, and spread to the steeple before it was brought under control at 6 p.m. Firefighters estimated the damage at $25,000. Rev. Phillips said the steeple housed the church’s library and records.

“I was just in the process of buying insurance, so we didn’t have any,” Rev. Phillips said as he watched firefighters pry planks of charred wood from the 90-year-old building. He said his congregation of 45 Hispanics is “too small and too poor” to contribute to repairing the church building. Firefighters and policemen said they suspect the fire may be the result of arson, and that the arson squad is investigating.
The building next to the church, the Fields Corner Municipal Building at 195 Adams st., has gone up in flames several times in the past month, firefighters said, and has been under 24-hour surveillance last few weeks. “The proximity and the timing make this fire look all too suspicious,” one policeman at the scene said of the church’s fire.

The Hispanic congregation has been using the Immanuel Baptist Church as its home since 1976, Rev. Phillips said. 

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The Dorchester Illustration of the Day (DIOTD) is sent weekdays. If you receive this e-mail by mistake, please reply to be taken off the e-mail list. If you know others who would like to receive the daily e-mail, please encourage them to join the group by going to http://groups.google.com/group/dorchester-historical-society. You may contact Earl Taylor at ERMMWWT@aol.com

If you value receiving the DIOTD, please express your appreciation by making a donation to the Dorchester Historical Society, either by regular mail at 195 Boston Street, Dorchester, MA 02125, or through the website at www.DorchesterHistoricalSociety.org

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Dorcester Illustration no. 2129

Dorchester Illustration no. 2129

 

Photograph showing the newly-constructed bridge across the Neponset River from Dorchester to Quincy in 1970.

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The Dorchester Illustration of the Day (DIOTD) is sent weekdays. If you receive this e-mail by mistake, please reply to be taken off the e-mail list. If you know others who would like to receive the daily e-mail, please encourage them to join the group by going to http://groups.google.com/group/dorchester-historical-society. You may contact Earl Taylor at ERMMWWT@aol.com

If you value receiving the DIOTD, please express your appreciation by making a donation to the Dorchester Historical Society, either by regular mail at 195 Boston Street, Dorchester, MA 02125, or through the website at www.DorchesterHistoricalSociety.org

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Dorchester Illustration no. 2128

Dorchester Illustration  no. 2128

After several years of sending out the illustration of the day, I have realized that I can no longer keep up the daily schedule.  Therefore, the illustration will be sent out occasionally but continuing the same numbering system.

 The Dorchester Old North Burying Ground has a marker for Ann a Negro slave. (Photo on left)

 “Ann, a Negro Child Belonging to Mr. Robert Oliver, & Daughter to his Negro Mimbo; Aged 2 Yrs., Died June 1743.”

Keith Stokes reports: We have the exact marker in Newport, RI, (photo on right) in our Slave and Free African burying ground.From our records, Robert Oliver was largely in Boston/Dorchester and not very active in Newport at the time. However, Oliver was from Antigua and there are a number of Newport merchants connected to Antigua. What we can tell you is Ann’s mother name is Mimbo. The Akan people of the Gold Coast (Ghana) frequently name their children after the day of the week they were born and the order in which they were born. Mimbo is the day name for girls born on Tuesday and many of the New England slaves came from Ghana or Senegal. 

We might speculate that the Oliver family was so enamored of the young girl that they felt the need to erect grave stones in both Dorchester and Newport.

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The Dorchester Illustration  is sent occasionally. If you receive this e-mail by mistake, please reply to be taken off the e-mail list. If you know others who would like to receive the daily e-mail, please encourage them to join the group by going to http://groups.google.com/group/dorchester-historical-society. You may contact Earl Taylor at ERMMWWT@aol.com

If you value receiving these emails, please express your appreciation by making a donation to the Dorchester Historical Society, either by regular mail at 195 Boston Street, Dorchester, MA 02125, or through the website at www.DorchesterHistoricalSociety.org

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Desmond Rohan will run the marathon to benefit Dorch Hist Soc and Roger Clap School

Desmond Rohan

http://www.crowdrise.com/dhs-rcis/fundraiser/desmondrohan

(Desmond is on the right)

Benefiting: DORCHESTER HISTORICAL SOCIETY AND ROGER CLAP School.

EVENT: Boston Marathon 2014

EVENT DATE: Apr 21, 2014

DAYS TO GO: 128

THE STORY:

I am running ONE LAST TIME!!!  After volunteering at the finish line last year with the medals and witnessing the tragic events of the day first-hand ( see my before with colleague Ron and after photos)…it only felt right to return to the Marathon and race this time for some great causes.  Boston is such a great place to live, work and visit and we need to support causes that educate and improve the quality of our lives we often take for granted…I am hoping you can support me…  Remember tax deductions for 2013….

Below is some great info on my charities…

Two very important nonprofits need your help. The Dorchester Historical Society http://www.dorchesterhistoricalsociety.org celebrates this section of Boston history while also bringing to the community great programs about our City’s history and architecture. The Roger Clap School is also an important institution where a great administration works to educate our elementary school youth.  It is also where one of my former staff, Bill D’Antonio, volunteered continuing his good works with children until he was suddenly taken from us. They have a large initiative to revamp their outside school yard where these funds will be earmarked.

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2013-Dec.-8th Holiday Party

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October 27th: Dorch Hist Soc Program: Boston’s Downtown Movie Palaces

Boston’s Downtown Movie Palaces

 

 

 

 

Arthur Singer will talk about the history of Boston’s theatres, their evolution in the city, and how several theatres have been saved and restored.  The talk will be followed by a book signing.

 

William Clapp House, 195 Boston Street

Sunday, October 27, 2 pm

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Dorchester Illustration of the Day no. 2127 Eaton Square

Dorchester Illustration of the Day no. 2127

Postcard. Caption on front: Eaton Square showing First Parish Church, Dorchester, Mass.  Postmarked July 29, [probably about 1910], with one-cent stamp.  On verso: The Rotograph Co., N.Y. City. Printed in Germany 56490

Note: I need to take break from sending out the Illustration of the Day.  I can’t promise when the series will begin again, perhaps in a few months.

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The Dorchester Illustration of the Day (DIOTD) is sent weekdays. If you receive this e-mail by mistake, please reply to be taken off the e-mail list. If you know others who would like to receive the daily e-mail, please encourage them to join the group by going to http://groups.google.com/group/dorchester-historical-society. You may contact Earl Taylor at ERMMWWT@aol.com

If you value receiving the DIOTD, please express your appreciation by making a donation to the Dorchester Historical Society, either by regular mail at 195 Boston Street, Dorchester, MA 02125, or through the website at www.DorchesterHistoricalSociety.org

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Dorchester Illustration of the Day no. 2126 Mellin’s Food

Dorchester Illustration of the Day no. 2126

1894 advertisement for Mellins Food with illustration of Marian Louise Bowker, Neponset, Mass.

By the 1890s the most popular by far of the powders to be added to milk was Mellins Food, developed in England and manufactured in Boston, whose advertisements claimed that it was “the genuine Liebigs Food,” The best known of the dried-milk products was another European import, Nestles Milk Food, which was manufactured and distributed under license by a New York City firm. Advertisements for various proprietary infant foods because well-nigh ubiquitious by the 1890s….Nestles (“Best for Babies”) said it was better for babies than milk, for “impure milk in hot weather is one of the chief causes of sickness among babies.”…A favorite promotional technique was to offer free samples by mail to the readers of middle-class magazines. Perhaps the most effective with middle-class mothers…were the free handbooks on infant care feeding distributed by the companies. Mellins with its own press, was especially active in this field. The handbooks explained the chemistry of milk and feeding in clear but relatively sophisticated language, adding an aura of science to the food they were promoting.

see:  http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodbaby.html

 

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The Dorchester Illustration of the Day (DIOTD) is sent weekdays. If you receive this e-mail by mistake, please reply to be taken off the e-mail list. If you know others who would like to receive the daily e-mail, please encourage them to join the group by going to http://groups.google.com/group/dorchester-historical-society. You may contact Earl Taylor at ERMMWWT@aol.com

If you value receiving the DIOTD, please express your appreciation by making a donation to the Dorchester Historical Society, either by regular mail at 195 Boston Street, Dorchester, MA 02125, or through the website at www.DorchesterHistoricalSociety.org

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